Fin Keegan

Working on Production-to-Consumption Ratio

Andy Warhol’s words to Lou Reed…

He said, “How many songs did you write?”
I’d written zero, I’d lied and said, “Ten.”
"You won’t be young forever
You should have written fifteen”
It’s work, the most important thing is work
It’s work, the most important thing is work

The Human Homunculus

via Rourke, this image is a Somatotopic representation of the human homunculus or Cortical Homunculus.

The cortical homunculus is a visual representation of the concept of “the body within the brain” that one’s hand or face exists as much as a series of nerve structures or a “neuron concept” as it does a physical form.

-Wikipedia: Cortical homunculus

If you want to stay hale and healthy,stop worrying about trifles and do not allow anger to take hold of you. Do not drink too much wine, and do not overeat. Have a light lunch and skip the afternoon nap. Have a pee before your bladder gets too distended and do not strain too hard when at stool. If there are no doctors around, do not worry: the best doctors are a happy mind, the absence of stress, and moderation.

Regimen Sanitatis Salernitanum (c1300)

The Line of Propriety

It is thanks to Joyce that we have a much clearer idea, not only of what went on in people’s inner lives in Dublin in 1904 but in urbanized life everywhere: these men and women’s secret trials and triumphs, their uncensored desires and fears, were hidden from view before brave artists such as Joyce (and Tolstoy and Flaubert before him) broke Victorian taboos and demolished the line of propriety.

-Fin Keegan, Dubliner: The Story of James Joyce amzn.to/KZA1iy

secretcinema1:

On account of her family moving from Italy to France and then to Switzerland Lucia became multi-lingual. With her father, she only ever spoke in Triestian Italian. The two became extremely close. Lucia worshipped him and longed for his attention. He was fascinated by her, describing this ‘fantastic being’ as a ‘wonder wild’ with a mind ‘as clear and as unsparing as the lightning.’ He was convinced that she was the true inheritor of his genius. This tall, pale and skinny girl sought to make her mark with humorous impersonations of Chaplin and then, at the age of 15, she began to dance. During the 1920s, the Parisian dance scene was going through a radically innovative and anti-balletic phase. Lucia became one of a group of experimental dancers who toured Europe. She excelled in sauvage roles. Her style was erotic rather than sensuous; one Parisian critic described it as ‘subtle and barbaric’. In 1927 she had a role as a toy soldier in Jean Renoir’s film ‘The Little Match Girl.’ The following year, a reporter for The Paris Times wrote: ‘When she reaches her full capacity for rhythmic dancing, James Joyce may yet be known as his daughter’s father.’

secretcinema1:

On account of her family moving from Italy to France and then to Switzerland Lucia became multi-lingual. With her father, she only ever spoke in Triestian Italian. The two became extremely close. Lucia worshipped him and longed for his attention. He was fascinated by her, describing this ‘fantastic being’ as a ‘wonder wild’ with a mind ‘as clear and as unsparing as the lightning.’ He was convinced that she was the true inheritor of his genius. This tall, pale and skinny girl sought to make her mark with humorous impersonations of Chaplin and then, at the age of 15, she began to dance. During the 1920s, the Parisian dance scene was going through a radically innovative and anti-balletic phase. Lucia became one of a group of experimental dancers who toured Europe. She excelled in sauvage roles. Her style was erotic rather than sensuous; one Parisian critic described it as ‘subtle and barbaric’. In 1927 she had a role as a toy soldier in Jean Renoir’s film ‘The Little Match Girl.’ The following year, a reporter for The Paris Times wrote: ‘When she reaches her full capacity for rhythmic dancing, James Joyce may yet be known as his daughter’s father.’

"For a smaller group of people, with palpably grandiose notions, it is up to everybody else to accommodate their new personality, often in a new place where they are free to be who they want to be without much question: great achievers from Bob Dylan and Oscar Wilde to Picasso and Andy Warhol have done this, often changing their name, their physical appearance, even (in the case of Joseph Conrad or Samuel Beckett) the very words they think in: how complete a remaking of oneself is replacing the Mother Tongue?"
from Dubliner: The Story of James Joyce

"For a smaller group of people, with palpably grandiose notions, it is up to everybody else to accommodate their new personality, often in a new place where they are free to be who they want to be without much question: great achievers from Bob Dylan and Oscar Wilde to Picasso and Andy Warhol have done this, often changing their name, their physical appearance, even (in the case of Joseph Conrad or Samuel Beckett) the very words they think in: how complete a remaking of oneself is replacing the Mother Tongue?"


from Dubliner: The Story of James Joyce

He rose from years of hunger and disappointment to become the most renowned literary artist of the age. Walk into any bookshop or library worthy of the name and you are likely to find his work on the shelves. His candour, once censored, is now prized; his graceful prose cherished; and his struggle for recognition thoroughly documented: James Joyce was a one-off who changed literature forever.
He was also a man who, sent out by his hungry family to buy food, returned instead with a hand-painted silk scarf.
from Dubliner: The Story of James Joyce

He rose from years of hunger and disappointment to become the most renowned literary artist of the age. Walk into any bookshop or library worthy of the name and you are likely to find his work on the shelves. His candour, once censored, is now prized; his graceful prose cherished; and his struggle for recognition thoroughly documented: James Joyce was a one-off who changed literature forever.


He was also a man who, sent out by his hungry family to buy food, returned instead with a hand-painted silk scarf.


from Dubliner: The Story of James Joyce